Does The Cloud Put a Cloud Over Your Media Content?

By Patrik - May 2, 2015

You know that your team and your external producers are using Dropbox, S3 and their laptop to store their video, instead of storing it where YOU want. Do you want to spend your time making them change their mind, or do you want to see their content and create value from it?

A while ago I read a Dropbox blog post about a documentary film team, using Dropbox to be able to work across two continents half a day apart. By using Dropbox instead of shipping hard disks using FedEx, they were able to edit and shoot footage at the same time. The team in India was filming, and the team in NY could take a look at it first thing in the morning, and then have feedback for the film crew ready when the woke up next day.

This is a step forward compared to shipping drives with footage. This story was about Dropbox, but the same applies for all cloud storages.

“you also have the opportunity of local transcoding to get the web versions quicker, without waiting for huge files uploaded over slow networks”

Now imagine these two scenarios:

  • You have three film crews in three locations, and they all use different cloud storages or just store everything on their laptops. You either have to make sure that everyone uses the same cloud storage, or centralise everything by moving it to another storage system.
  • One of the film crews is in a location where the network connections are unreliable or slow, but you still want to be able to review their footage as soon as possible. Uploading hi-res footage will take forever, and you might have to go back to FedEx.

Our solution, VidiXplore, puts a video aware layer on top of your storage, adding intelligence to your cloud storage or local machines. Connect cloud storages from Dropbox, AWS S3, or Azure, and make collection with all your project files, even if they are on separate cloud storages. The originals stay on the cloud storage, and you get access to a web version for viewing. With the VidiXplore Agent you also have the opportunity of local transcoding to get the web versions quicker, without waiting for huge files uploaded over slow networks.

In both cases, if you so choose, you can also upload all the video to VidiXplore to keep track of the originals. From there you can transcode the files to other formats, e.g., a house format, no matter what the original was.